Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he covers race, identity, and culture.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Florido was a reporter at Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, where he covered public and community health. Prior to that, he was at KPBS in San Diego, reporting on the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration, and demographics as a member of the Fronteras Desk, a team of reporters covering the changing Southwest. He began his journalism career reporting on people and neighborhoods at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on the U.S. and Latin America. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's a runner and loves good coffee and great music. He has a particular love of traditional string music from the Mexican state of Veracruz, a style often called Son Jarocho. He travels to Veracruz as often as possible to learn from master musicians. He's also one of the organizers of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates San Diego from Tijuana.

You can listen to Florido's stories here, and follow him on Twitter at @adrianflorido.

Code Switch's Adrian Florido has been covering the new sanctuary movement for us. For this episode, he spoke to key players to understand why hundreds of churches are ready to start a public fight with the current administration to prevent deportations of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

He also looks at why the movement has to wrestle with important questions: Who controls the story and the message? How much say does an individual or family have in how a sanctuary church leverages their story?

Over the weekend, I was in Los Angeles and attended a production of Zoot Suit, by the trailblazing Chicano playwright Luis Valdez.

Defense Secretary James Mattis said on Sunday that he disagreed with President Trump's recent declaration that the press is "the enemy."

The racial wealth gap has been measured and studied for decades. One fact has remained the same: White families build and accumulate more wealth more quickly than black and brown families do.

The notion that some immigrants in the United States illegally are more deserving of the right to stay than others has been a tenet of U.S. immigration policies for some time.

President Barack Obama often alluded to it when he talked about how the government should determine whom to deport. "Felons, not families," he said in 2014, suggesting that some immigrants are good and others are bad.

Pages