Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he covers race, identity, and culture.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Florido was a reporter at Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, where he covered public and community health. Prior to that, he was at KPBS in San Diego, reporting on the U.S.-Mexico border, immigration, and demographics as a member of the Fronteras Desk, a team of reporters covering the changing Southwest. He began his journalism career reporting on people and neighborhoods at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on the U.S. and Latin America. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's a runner and loves good coffee and great music. He has a particular love of traditional string music from the Mexican state of Veracruz, a style often called Son Jarocho. He travels to Veracruz as often as possible to learn from master musicians. He's also one of the organizers of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates San Diego from Tijuana.

You can listen to Florido's stories here, and follow him on Twitter at @adrianflorido.

The leadership of Puerto Rico's troubled electric utility — PREPA — crumbled on Thursday, as a majority of its board of directors, including its newly named CEO, resigned rather than submit to demands by the island's governor that the new CEO's salary be reduced.

Luis Vázquez walked up to the elegant marble plaza in front of Puerto Rico's capitol building, bent over, and took off his shoes. He placed them among more than 400 other pairs that over several hours on Friday began forming a growing memorial to the hundreds, possibly thousands of people believed to have died as a direct or indirect result of Hurricane Maria, but whom Puerto Rico's government has yet to count.

Vázquez said his father was one of them.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

All right, let's get some reaction now from Puerto Rico, which is where we find our colleague, NPR's Adrian Florido. Hey, Adrian.

ADRIAN FLORIDO, BYLINE: Hi, Mary Louise.

For more than a week, Puerto Rico's representative in Congress has been urging the Federal Emergency Management Agency to extend the contract under which mainland power crews have been helping repair the island's power grid.

Updated 5:58 p.m. ET

The last of the federal government's power restoration crews are scheduled to leave Puerto Rico when their contract expires next week, leaving the island's power utility with the task of energizing the last 1.5 percent of customers still waiting eight months after Hurricane Maria.

But on Wednesday, the island's representative in Congress asked the federal government not to send its crews home.

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