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Doctors have long known that black people are more likely than white people to suffer from diseases such as high blood pressure. A study suggests that racial discrimination may be playing a role in a surprising way.

The study, which involved 150 African-Americans living in Tallahassee, Fla., found that knowing someone who had experienced racial discrimination was associated with genetic markers that may affect risk for high blood pressure.

It's become a tradition in the NFL for players to go out for an exorbitantly expensive meal to welcome rookies — and then stick them with the bill.

Houston Texans safety K.J. Dillon fell victim to such a stunt Monday night at a Pappas restaurant. The tab was a whopping $16,255.20.

To glance at some of the political news this week, you'd think it was October.

Clinton campaign Chairman John Podesta did Meet the Press over the weekend to talk about Russia hacking the DNC's emails.

Hillary Clinton aide Brian Fallon took to Twitter on Tuesday to question the FBI's investigation into Clinton's emails.

Officials blame a bath lotion used as a liquor substitute in Russia for an outbreak of alcohol poisoning that has now killed 61 people, according to state-run media. As the death toll mounts, President Vladimir Putin plans to cut excise taxes on alcohol, in an effort to cut the demand for surrogate options.

Carola Garcia-Calvo spends her days poring over Islamic State propaganda. It's part of her job as a global terrorism analyst at Madrid's Elcano Royal Institute, a think tank.

Recently, she has noticed a shift.

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