The purpose of the meeting is to review and vote to recommend the proposed Fiscal 2018 budget to the full Board for approval at its July 3rd meeting in Gualala. 

A copy of the proposed budget is available on the KZYX website (click here to read).

Members of the public are invited to attend, and there will be a public comment period.

Once again, that's the Board's Finance Committee meeting on Friday, June 30th at 10:30AM at the Philo studio.

The next meeting of the KZYX Board of Directors will take place Monday, July 3, 2017 at Gualala Arts Center, 46501 Old State Highway in Gualala. The board meeting will begin at 6:00pm and will include time for public comment. The KZYX Board meets Monday, July 3, at 6:00pm at Gualala Arts Center in Gualala.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service will be holding a public meeting in Fort Bragg Thursday about the future of its  northern spotted owl assistance program.

According to a release from the Department of Interior, the service plans to stop providing the program for timber operations. However, there will still be training and guidance to California Fish and Wildlife and Cal Fire operations.

The meeting, which will also include representatives from the CDFW and Calfire, will be held at 4 p.m. at the Redwood Coast Senior Center.

A boy was killed after he fell off a cliff in Westport on Thursday.

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According to the Ukiah Daily Journal, the West-Virginia native attempted to climb down the cliff in the 42,000 block of Highway 1 when  he fell about 60 feet onto some rocks.

Emergency workers in helicopters responded to the scene but they could not revive him.

The victim’s identity has not been released. The Mendocino County Coroner is investigating the incident.

The Log Walk event that started last year in protest of timber company practices such as the Hack and Squirt method, where tanoak trees are injected with an herbicide and killed, continues next weekend. The Pacific Alliance for Indigenous and Environmental Action - a coalition of activists, recently announced they are hosting another walk in protest of Caltrans' plans to widen part of Highway 101 through ancient redwoods at Richardson Grove State Park in Humboldt County.

Fireworks Are Illegal

Jun 18, 2017

All types of fireworks are illegal in Mendocino County reminds CAL FIRE Mendocino Unit Chief George Gonzalez. He states the careless handling of fireworks pose a major danger to California and its residents, and that fireworks have caused serious injuries nationwide. Children are at the greatest risk of injury.

The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for inland Mendocino County through Tuesday, June 20, 2017. Temperatures are expected to peak between the mid 90’s and 107 degrees.

More Local News

The KZYX Online Auction is Here!

A great way to help Local Community Radio. Bid early and often and GOOD LUCK!

Station News

The purpose of the meeting is to review and vote to recommend the proposed Fiscal 2018 budget to the full Board for approval at its July 3rd meeting in Gualala. 

A copy of the proposed budget is available on the KZYX website (click here to read).

Members of the public are invited to attend, and there will be a public comment period.

Once again, that's the Board's Finance Committee meeting on Friday, June 30th at 10:30AM at the Philo studio.

The next meeting of the KZYX Board of Directors will take place Monday, July 3, 2017 at Gualala Arts Center, 46501 Old State Highway in Gualala. The board meeting will begin at 6:00pm and will include time for public comment. The KZYX Board meets Monday, July 3, at 6:00pm at Gualala Arts Center in Gualala.

Ross Murray was one of the founding members of KZYX and hosted public affairs and commentary programs for many years as well as donating both funds and equipment to the station. His 5 minute political commentaries were a must-listen for years on KZYX.

Program Showcase

On Friday June 16, 2017, Politics: A Love Story host Bob Bushansky interviewed Ruth Greenwood, an attorney with The Campaign Legal Center who is part of the legal team representing plaintiffs in Gill v Whitford, a major legal challenge to an alleged case of political gerrymandering in Wisconsion.

On Forthright Radio, Gar Alperovitz discusses his latest work with The Next System Project, PRINCIPLES OF A PLURALIST COMMONWEALTH, which explores the political-economic system models that deliver superior social, economic and ecological outcomes.  

Click here to listen to Joy LaClaire's 21 June 2017 interview with Gar Alperovitz.

 

Jeffrey Parker

Build it or fix it? When does it make more sense to buy an ongoing business that's struggling, rather than starting a new business from scratch?

Mendocino Works posed this question and many others to Taylor Pedersen, a San Francisco restaurateur who with his partner Chris Struett took over Ukiah brewpub Ritual in February. Pedersen describes how he and Struett are re-inventing the business to their own vision under its original name, Ukiah Brewing Company.

Click this link to listen to the complete broadcast. 

While she was a primary care doctor in Oakland, Calif., Dr. Vanessa Grubbs fell in love with a man who had been living with kidney disease since he was a teenager.

Seized by violence and teetering on the edge of famine, Yemen is grappling with another danger that threatens to outpace them both: cholera.

"We are now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world," international health authorities said in a statement Saturday.

You could say Martha is a rather cheeky gal.

That is, the jowly 3-year-old Neapolitan mastiff has some remarkably expansive cheeks — so expansive, in fact, they droop practically to her knees and flap like slobbery wings when she shakes her head.

And now they've earned Martha a prestigious honor: the title of world's ugliest dog.

Pakistan was hit with a spate of violence in several cities Friday, leaving the country to cope with the deaths of dozens of people and scores more injured. In twin bombings at a market in Parachinar, a car bombing in Quetta and a shooting in Karachi, more than 80 people were killed in the bloodshed.

In a major property rights decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has delivered a decisive victory to state and local governments and environmental groups.

By a 5-to-3 vote, the justices made it much harder for property owners to get compensation from the government when zoning regulations restrict the use of just part of landowners' property.

Authorities in London evacuated roughly 650 apartments in a high-rise complex overnight, citing fears that the complex bore many of the safety issues that Grenfell Tower did. Councilmembers for the London borough of Camden say it was the stark memory of the Grenfell blaze, which killed at least 79 people earlier this month, that spurred them to act.

The type of siding or "cladding" used on the Grenfell Tower in London — and suspected of feeding the massive fire that killed dozens of residents — is not allowed on the exterior of tall buildings across most of the U.S.

But a few states and the District of Columbia have relaxed their building codes in recent years and have started to permit the material's use.

She has no phone, no laptop, no Internet and no air conditioning inside her cell. It's 93 degrees outside, but Leila de Lima looks remarkably composed.

The Philippine senator spends much of her time reading and attending to Senate business as best she can, though she isn't allowed to vote. De Lima, a 57-year-old grandmother, was imprisoned in February on President Rodrigo Duterte's orders, after poking the bear one too many times. The charges against her, which she denies, include taking money from jailed drug dealers.

On a typical block in Hong Kong, thousands of people live on top of each other. Pol Fàbrega thinks about all these people as he looks up at the towering high rises above the streets. And then he thinks about all that space above all these people.

"The square footage here is incredibly expensive," says Fàbrega, staring upwards. "But yet, if you look at Hong Kong from above, it's full of empty rooftops."

It is, he says, a big opportunity for growth.

There are only two ways to get to Meyers Chuck, Alaska: by boat or float plane.

If you go by plane, you might hitch a ride on a de Havilland Beaver, circa 1958 — one of the planes that brings the mail every week. It comes in low over specks of islands and the forested Alaska coast, and curves into the protected inlet of Meyers Chuck, splashing down at high tide.

On the day we visit, a handful of boats are tied up along a floating mooring. Small wooden cabins are nestled among the trees.

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On Friday June 16, 2017, Politics: A Love Story host Bob Bushansky interviewed Ruth Greenwood, an attorney with The Campaign Legal Center who is part of the legal team representing plaintiffs in Gill v Whitford, a major legal challenge to an alleged case of political gerrymandering in Wisconsion.