The purpose of the meeting is to review and vote to recommend the proposed Fiscal 2018 budget to the full Board for approval at its July 3rd meeting in Gualala. 

A copy of the proposed budget is available on the KZYX website (click here to read).

Members of the public are invited to attend, and there will be a public comment period.

Once again, that's the Board's Finance Committee meeting on Friday, June 30th at 10:30AM at the Philo studio.

The next meeting of the KZYX Board of Directors will take place Monday, July 3, 2017 at Gualala Arts Center, 46501 Old State Highway in Gualala. The board meeting will begin at 6:00pm and will include time for public comment. The KZYX Board meets Monday, July 3, at 6:00pm at Gualala Arts Center in Gualala.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service will be holding a public meeting in Fort Bragg Thursday about the future of its  northern spotted owl assistance program.

According to a release from the Department of Interior, the service plans to stop providing the program for timber operations. However, there will still be training and guidance to California Fish and Wildlife and Cal Fire operations.

The meeting, which will also include representatives from the CDFW and Calfire, will be held at 4 p.m. at the Redwood Coast Senior Center.

A boy was killed after he fell off a cliff in Westport on Thursday.

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According to the Ukiah Daily Journal, the West-Virginia native attempted to climb down the cliff in the 42,000 block of Highway 1 when  he fell about 60 feet onto some rocks.

Emergency workers in helicopters responded to the scene but they could not revive him.

The victim’s identity has not been released. The Mendocino County Coroner is investigating the incident.

The Log Walk event that started last year in protest of timber company practices such as the Hack and Squirt method, where tanoak trees are injected with an herbicide and killed, continues next weekend. The Pacific Alliance for Indigenous and Environmental Action - a coalition of activists, recently announced they are hosting another walk in protest of Caltrans' plans to widen part of Highway 101 through ancient redwoods at Richardson Grove State Park in Humboldt County.

Fireworks Are Illegal

Jun 18, 2017

All types of fireworks are illegal in Mendocino County reminds CAL FIRE Mendocino Unit Chief George Gonzalez. He states the careless handling of fireworks pose a major danger to California and its residents, and that fireworks have caused serious injuries nationwide. Children are at the greatest risk of injury.

The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for inland Mendocino County through Tuesday, June 20, 2017. Temperatures are expected to peak between the mid 90’s and 107 degrees.

More Local News

The KZYX Online Auction is Here!

A great way to help Local Community Radio. Bid early and often and GOOD LUCK!

Station News

The purpose of the meeting is to review and vote to recommend the proposed Fiscal 2018 budget to the full Board for approval at its July 3rd meeting in Gualala. 

A copy of the proposed budget is available on the KZYX website (click here to read).

Members of the public are invited to attend, and there will be a public comment period.

Once again, that's the Board's Finance Committee meeting on Friday, June 30th at 10:30AM at the Philo studio.

The next meeting of the KZYX Board of Directors will take place Monday, July 3, 2017 at Gualala Arts Center, 46501 Old State Highway in Gualala. The board meeting will begin at 6:00pm and will include time for public comment. The KZYX Board meets Monday, July 3, at 6:00pm at Gualala Arts Center in Gualala.

Ross Murray was one of the founding members of KZYX and hosted public affairs and commentary programs for many years as well as donating both funds and equipment to the station. His 5 minute political commentaries were a must-listen for years on KZYX.

Program Showcase

On Friday June 16, 2017, Politics: A Love Story host Bob Bushansky interviewed Ruth Greenwood, an attorney with The Campaign Legal Center who is part of the legal team representing plaintiffs in Gill v Whitford, a major legal challenge to an alleged case of political gerrymandering in Wisconsion.

On Forthright Radio, Gar Alperovitz discusses his latest work with The Next System Project, PRINCIPLES OF A PLURALIST COMMONWEALTH, which explores the political-economic system models that deliver superior social, economic and ecological outcomes.  

Click here to listen to Joy LaClaire's 21 June 2017 interview with Gar Alperovitz.

 

Jeffrey Parker

Build it or fix it? When does it make more sense to buy an ongoing business that's struggling, rather than starting a new business from scratch?

Mendocino Works posed this question and many others to Taylor Pedersen, a San Francisco restaurateur who with his partner Chris Struett took over Ukiah brewpub Ritual in February. Pedersen describes how he and Struett are re-inventing the business to their own vision under its original name, Ukiah Brewing Company.

Click this link to listen to the complete broadcast. 

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will re-hear a case that asks whether immigrants detained by the government have a right to a bond hearing to challenge their indefinite detention.

The case was argued in November 2016, months before Justice Neil Gorsuch filled the vacant seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia.

You can catch cholera from drinking contaminated water.

You can catch it from raw or undercooked shellfish.

And you can catch it from soft-shell turtles.

That's the finding of a study published this month by scientists at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. And it's a particular concern in China and many other countries in East Asia, where turtle meat is often used in stews and soups.

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him across the U.S.-Mexico border for damages? The U.S. Supreme Court did not answer this question on Monday, instead opting to send a case back to a lower court.

The case centers on a larger question: whether the Constitution extends protection to an individual who is killed on foreign soil, even though that person is standing just a few yards outside the United States.

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that taxpayer-funded grants for playgrounds available to nonprofits under a state program could not be denied to a school run by a church.

"The consequence is, in all likelihood, a few extra scraped knees. But the exclusion of Trinity Lutheran from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious to our Constitution all the same, and cannot stand," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority.

The Democratic Unionist Party has given U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May enough votes to form a government, signing a "confidence and supply" agreement to back May's Conservatives in confidence votes and on key economic issues. The DUP also secured more than $1 billion in economic assistance for Northern Ireland.

"This agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the United Kingdom's national interest at this vital time," DUP leader Arlene Foster said.

For 24 years, Joe Arpaio was a tough talking sheriff in Arizona, famous for cracking down on illegal immigration.

About a decade ago Arpaio, dubbed "America's Toughest Sheriff" in conservative circles, started instructing his deputies to make traffic stops and detain any unauthorized immigrants they encountered. Then they'd turn the immigrants over to federal agents for deportation.

In many ways, parenting newborns seems instinctual.

We see a little baby, and we want to hold her. Snuggle and kiss her. Even just her smell seems magical.

Many of us think breast-feeding is similar.

"I had that idea before my first child was born," says Brooke Scelza, an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Los Angeles, California. "I definitely thought, 'Oh, I'm going to figure that out. Like how hard can it be?' "

Chinese authorities have granted dissident Liu Xiaobo medical parole, freeing the Nobel Peace Prize winner from prison because he has terminal liver cancer. Liu, 61, is being allowed to seek treatment in a hospital outside of prison.

"According to his lawyer, Liu was diagnosed with late-stage liver cancer while in prison last month," NPR's Rob Schmitz reports from Hong Kong. "[He] is being treated at a hospital in the northeastern city of Shenyang."

Ladi Adaikwu's top-shelf merchandise is hidden in a mud-brick shed in a warren of narrow alleyways in Angwan-Dodo, a farming village close to Nigeria's capital city Abuja. The steel door is secured with a heavy padlock, and when she opens it, a shaft of light cuts through the damp darkness to reveal what looks like a knee-high pile of narrow, dirt-encrusted footballs.

But don't be fooled by their humble appearance: These are high-quality yams, and around here they're as good as gold.

Pages

On Friday June 16, 2017, Politics: A Love Story host Bob Bushansky interviewed Ruth Greenwood, an attorney with The Campaign Legal Center who is part of the legal team representing plaintiffs in Gill v Whitford, a major legal challenge to an alleged case of political gerrymandering in Wisconsion.