A Word From Membership

Tune in to KZYX to hear the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival live from the Boonville Fairgrounds! June 22nd-24th. More information at http://www.snwmf.com/

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At some point, they were in love.

At least it looks as if they were in a photo that captures Emile Cilliers and his wife, Victoria, in what seems to be a moment of joy. He is dressed in a tuxedo and bow tie and has a closed-mouthed smile. She is wearing a deep blue halter with dangling earrings that match. Her smile is broad, and her arm is wrapped around his neck.

But the evidence — texts, emails and botched murder attempts — suggest that moment was ephemeral.

Deborah Epstein has spent her professional life fighting for victims of domestic violence. But protecting such victims is also what Epstein says led her to step down from a commission meant to tackle the issue of domestic violence in the National Football League.

Three months ago the students from South Florida established themselves as a potent force in the gun debate with the March For Our Lives rally. This summer they're hitting the road with a new mission: turn the wave of young activism they helped spark into an energized voting bloc for the November mid-term elections.

At the annual end-of-year peace march in Chicago, organized by St. Sabina Catholic Church, Grammy-winners Chance the Rapper and Jennifer Hudson, along with former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, joined the Parkland survivors to launch a bus tour called Road to Change.

Thirty-eight calves, between two and four months old, moo and kick at the dirt floor in a steel barn in Brush, Colo. One by one, a handler leads them from the pen to a narrow chute, where their legs are restrained and they're lifted onto a hydraulic table.

Emily Freeman, a writer in Montana, grew up unaffiliated to a religion — culturally Jewish on her father's side, a smattering of churchgoing on her mother's. She and her husband Nathan Freeman talked about not identifying as religious — but they didn't really discuss how it would affect their parenting.

"I think we put it in the big basket of things that we figured we had so much time to think about," Emily joked.

But then they had kids, and the kids came home from their grandfather's house talking about Bible stories.

The Department of Homeland Security says 1,995 minors were separated from their "alleged adult guardians" at the southern border in just over a monthlong period.

A DHS spokesman said the separations occurred between April 19 and the end of May under the administration's relatively new "zero tolerance" policy, in which parents have also been arrested.

This week in the Russia investigations: A Justice Department report impacts Washington like a meteor; the inspector general confirms the presence of likely fraudulent intelligence; a special agent's words could be a political gift to President Trump.

Aftermath

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz has painted his masterpiece.

Want to know what the teenagers in your life really think about sex and drugs?

Are you sure?

Well, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have a pretty good idea, thanks to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Every other year, thousands of teens in public and private high schools across the country take this nationally representative survey. The CDC just released results for 2017, and here are a few of the highlights:

Sex

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Curriculum changes for AP World History

This week, educators and students expressed their opposition to the College Board's decision to cut out parts of the Advanced Placement World History curriculum.

The College Board announced in May that it was removing early world history from the nationally taught high school course. Starting in 2019, the AP World History exam will only assess content from 1450 to the present.

On the last day of school in the rural town of Cairo, on the southernmost tip of Illinois, the fire truck ran its hoses so kids could cool off in the sweltering heat. The staff barbecued burgers and hot dogs.

It was a light-hearted anecdote to what had been another tough year.

After a precipitous decline since 2012, enrollment dropped by another 100 or so students. This year there were only 26 seniors in the graduating class.

Pages

A Place To Call Home: Donald Damp

21 hours ago

June 16, 2018 -- In this episode of A Place to Call Home, we'll hear from Donald Damp, an ambassador to the homeless community. He is formerly homeless himself, and now volunteers at organizations all over Ukiah, working to help currently homeless people get medical attention, basic necessities, and sometimes just a friendly or informative word. 

Tune in to hear him tell his story and discuss his philosophy about where life has led him.

Cultural Services Agency A Go

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- Over strenuous objections, the Board of Supervisors signaled their intent to form a Cultural Services Agency, which would place one director over the libraries, parks, and county museum. Budgets would remain separate. Friends of the library and several advisory boards say they were left out of the decision-making process.

County Workers Having A Tough Time

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- County workers showed up at last week's budget hearings with harsh words for supervisors, who voted themselves a substantial raise while many rank-and-file are struggling. We'll hear from a union rep and a 19-year-old worker, who supplements his full-time job at the county with a shift at Chipotle to make ends meet.

A Place To Call Home: James Hoffman

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- Today we'll hear from James David Hoffman about his experiences being homeless in Ukiah. Hoffman, or Jimbo, as some people call him, is from the Redwood Valley Rancheria, is profoundly hearing impaired, and has struggled with addiction since puberty. He told me his story on May 11, shortly after he got out of jail. He spoke about a searing trauma in his youth, the beauty of sign language, and how he believes the spirit of his lost daughter has guided him away from death. It was a privilege to be the recipient of his story.

O. Hope McKenney

Protesters gathered in more than two dozen cities across the country last Friday to stand against the Trump administration's practice of separating immigrant parents and children at the U.S. southern border, a big departure from past practice. The local inland Mendocino protest happened in front of the courthouse in downtown Ukiah at 5pm, the height of after-work traffic on State Street. Approximately 15 people were in attendance. 


More Local News

Local News

A Place To Call Home: Donald Damp

21 hours ago

June 16, 2018 -- In this episode of A Place to Call Home, we'll hear from Donald Damp, an ambassador to the homeless community. He is formerly homeless himself, and now volunteers at organizations all over Ukiah, working to help currently homeless people get medical attention, basic necessities, and sometimes just a friendly or informative word. 

Tune in to hear him tell his story and discuss his philosophy about where life has led him.

Cultural Services Agency A Go

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- Over strenuous objections, the Board of Supervisors signaled their intent to form a Cultural Services Agency, which would place one director over the libraries, parks, and county museum. Budgets would remain separate. Friends of the library and several advisory boards say they were left out of the decision-making process.

County Workers Having A Tough Time

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- County workers showed up at last week's budget hearings with harsh words for supervisors, who voted themselves a substantial raise while many rank-and-file are struggling. We'll hear from a union rep and a 19-year-old worker, who supplements his full-time job at the county with a shift at Chipotle to make ends meet.

A Place To Call Home: James Hoffman

Jun 12, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- Today we'll hear from James David Hoffman about his experiences being homeless in Ukiah. Hoffman, or Jimbo, as some people call him, is from the Redwood Valley Rancheria, is profoundly hearing impaired, and has struggled with addiction since puberty. He told me his story on May 11, shortly after he got out of jail. He spoke about a searing trauma in his youth, the beauty of sign language, and how he believes the spirit of his lost daughter has guided him away from death. It was a privilege to be the recipient of his story.

O. Hope McKenney

Protesters gathered in more than two dozen cities across the country last Friday to stand against the Trump administration's practice of separating immigrant parents and children at the U.S. southern border, a big departure from past practice. The local inland Mendocino protest happened in front of the courthouse in downtown Ukiah at 5pm, the height of after-work traffic on State Street. Approximately 15 people were in attendance. 


More Local News

Program Showcase

Ecosexuals

Jun 12, 2018

Host Dr. Richard Miller interviews Ecosexuals, Dr. Annie Sprinkle and Dr. Beth Stephens. Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle have been pollinating the ecosex movement through art, theory, practice and activism since 2004, they’ve produced numerous performance art works, ecosex symposiums, weddings to nature entities, workshops, walking tours, and art exhibits. Their award winning documentary, Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story played many film festivals and is on iTunes. Beth is an Art Professor at UC Santa Cruz, Annie earned Ph.D. in Human Sexuality.

Rat Poison in the Forest Ecosystem

Jun 10, 2018

Rat poison is killing a lot more than rats. Anticoagulant rodenticides have spread throughout the food web in California forests, even in remote areas. How are these poisons getting into the ecosystem? On The Ecology Hour - Science Edition, Dr. Mourad Gabriel of the Integral Ecology Research Center talks with Tim Bray and Dr. Robert Spies about his investigation into poisoned Pacific Fishers and many other animals. That's Tuesday June 12 at 7:00 PM here on KZYX.

Child & Family Services

Good to Know Mendo

Apr 30, 2018

GoodToKnowMendo.com

GoodToKnowMendo.com is part of a county-wide effort to educate residents and visitors about using marijuana safely and legally in Mendocino County. The site answers questions about who can purchase marijuana, the basics about how it is used, and other legal- and health-related issues.