President Trump is famous for requiring the loyalty of his subordinates. But it's the loyalty of Republican senators — not to him but to one of their own — that is the heart of a simmering showdown between the White House and Congress.

A growing number of GOP lawmakers appear to have had enough with what one has called the president's "public floggings" in recent days of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a onetime senator from Alabama for served on Capitol Hill for two decades before joining the Trump administration.

The head of the Boy Scouts of America apologized Thursday to the organization's members, telling them the group did not intend to showcase the "political rhetoric" in President Trump's speech to the National Jamboree earlier this week.

In a vast, dimly lit barn near Frankfort, Delaware, surrounded by tens of thousands of young chickens, about a dozen people in ghostly white coveralls are considering future options for the poultry industry.

The Trump administration's promise to turbocharge economic growth has yet to be fulfilled, even though forecasters are predicting that the economy has rebounded from a weak 1.4 percent annual growth rate in the first three months to a rate closer to 2.8 percent. That is the number many economists are expecting to see when the government issues its report on second-quarter growth on Friday.

The Girl Scouts of the USA unveiled 23 new badges related to science, technology, mathematics, and nature activities this week, responding to popular demand for activities related to interests such as the outdoors, mechanical engineering, and computer programming.

The new badges will have members designing robots and learning about mechanical engineering, " building and testing rollercoasters, race cars, and gliders," the organization said.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

The European slug is average in every way: slimy, brownish, shorter than a credit card.

But Arion subfuscus has a minor superpower: When it's scared, it can glue itself to wet surfaces very well, and do so while remaining bendy.

Speaking at a news conference in Finland on Thursday, Russian President Vladimir Putin derided the sanctions bill now in the U.S. Congress as "illegal under international law" — but he said Russia's response will depend on what ultimately gets passed.

"We haven't seen the final version yet, so we haven't got any kind of definitive view on it," Putin said, "but we can see that over a lengthy period they are trying to provoke us more and more."

The deaths of 10 migrants in a sweltering 18-wheeler in San Antonio has raised a lot of questions. One of them: Why transport people in the back of a tractor-trailer, especially after they have already crossed the border?

One reason, experts say, is that entering the United States from Mexico illegally involves "two crossings." You must first cross the U.S./Mexico border, then one of the many Border Patrol checkpoints that exist farther into the United States.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The nation's highest-ranking military officer said Thursday that the Defense Department was making "no modifications" to current policy regarding transgender service members until President Trump gives more direction.

Pages

Program Showcase

Music Without Borders with Joel Cohen 07/17/2017

Jul 17, 2017

10:06AM-10:10AM (4:31) Ralph Towner “Pilgrim” composed by Ralph Towner from My Foolish Heart (2017) on ecm New

10:12AM-10:15AM (3:00) Judith Farmer & Nic Gerpe “Flurry” composed by Gernot Wolfgang from Gernot Wolfgang: Passing Through on Albany Records

Friday July 14th at 9 a.m. Pacific daylight time on Politics: A Love Story, Bob Bushansky interviews Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former director of the Congressional Budget Office and current president of the American Action Forum policy institute, a conservative think tank. They discuss a study that Holtz-Eakin oversaw during his CBO tenure from 2003 to 2005 that concluded that tax cuts to stimulate the economy usually do not pay for themselves and actually lose the economy 50-70 cents for each dollar cut.

Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, is once again affecting bodies of water in the area, and local Public and Environmental Health officials are advising people to avoid contact with this potentially toxic bacteria.

Three fires broke out in Lake County on Monday but they were quickly contained.

The first occurred around 2 p.m. in a field across from the 16000 block of Bryant Road in Lower Lake.  The blaze, which was between three to five acres and drew a response of multiple agencies, had its forward progress halted when it ran into a nearby creek 30 minutes later.

It was reported as contained around 3 p.m.

A water main broke in an alley in Fort Bragg on Monday.

According to a press release from the city, the main broke around 4 p.m. off of Elm Street in between Franklin and Stewart Streets. A crew from The Department of Public Works responded and is working to minimize disruption to customers as far as several blocks away. 

A temporary repair was expected Tuesday morning.

Reporter Jason Morash talks with The Willits News editor Ariel Carmona about a proposed billboard to help businesses affected by the U.S. Highway 101 bypass, the Grade Fire, and fire hazard-properties in Brooktrails.

In the wake of the California Legislature’s passage of its massive transportation funding bill, CalTrans has decided to immediately expedite some of the money to 13 projects statewide.

One of those projects will be here in Mendocino County, as the agency plans to pave four miles of State Route 162 near Covelo.

According to Caltrans District One representative Phil Frisbie, the $3 million project — which will span from mile markers 25 to 29 — is expected to be completed by the end of the summer.

More Local News

Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, is once again affecting bodies of water in the area, and local Public and Environmental Health officials are advising people to avoid contact with this potentially toxic bacteria.

Three fires broke out in Lake County on Monday but they were quickly contained.

The first occurred around 2 p.m. in a field across from the 16000 block of Bryant Road in Lower Lake.  The blaze, which was between three to five acres and drew a response of multiple agencies, had its forward progress halted when it ran into a nearby creek 30 minutes later.

It was reported as contained around 3 p.m.

A water main broke in an alley in Fort Bragg on Monday.

According to a press release from the city, the main broke around 4 p.m. off of Elm Street in between Franklin and Stewart Streets. A crew from The Department of Public Works responded and is working to minimize disruption to customers as far as several blocks away. 

A temporary repair was expected Tuesday morning.

Reporter Jason Morash talks with The Willits News editor Ariel Carmona about a proposed billboard to help businesses affected by the U.S. Highway 101 bypass, the Grade Fire, and fire hazard-properties in Brooktrails.

In the wake of the California Legislature’s passage of its massive transportation funding bill, CalTrans has decided to immediately expedite some of the money to 13 projects statewide.

One of those projects will be here in Mendocino County, as the agency plans to pave four miles of State Route 162 near Covelo.

According to Caltrans District One representative Phil Frisbie, the $3 million project — which will span from mile markers 25 to 29 — is expected to be completed by the end of the summer.

More Local News

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It's Thursday afternoon, and Mariah Gilardin was in the Philo studio to host a Pledge Drive edition of TUC Radio featuring a talk by acclaimed progressive activist and author Naomi Klein. KZYX is offering Naomi Klein's new book, "No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning The World We Need" as a Pledge Drive thank you gift for a pledge of $150 or more.  

You rely on KZYX to bring you the programs you love, and the news you need.

KZYX relies on you for survival, and now more than ever, listeners make it all happen.